Difference between revisions of "Presentations"

From ConTeXt wiki
(general introduction to making presentations (still many parts missing))
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< [[Main Page]] | \[[SlideWithSteps]] >
 
< [[Main Page]] | \[[SlideWithSteps]] >
  
'''Note: some changes have been added recently to the module, so that this and the following site have to be updated.'''
 
Please see [[http://cfd.homelinux.org/tex/ Raw steps module]] for the latest version.
 
  
==Official modules==
+
== Using existing presentation styles ==
  
Waiting for someone to write something about them ...
+
Even if you are not going to use the existing presentation styles (you're strongly encouraged to make your own anyway), these are wonderful examples to learn some new techniques. See [[Presentation Styles]] for a list of available styles.
  
* ...
+
<texcode>
* [[RawSteps]] module
+
\usemodule[pre-funny]
 +
</texcode>
  
==Some Ideas==
+
You can usually change background color or make minor changes to the existing style in a pretty simple way (I hope it will be described in [[Presentation Styles]] how to do that one day). You may have to override some font definitions used for a specific style if you don't have the font installed.
 +
 
 +
== Making your own presentation style ==
 +
 
 +
Building a presentation in ConTeXt is not much different than preparing an usual ConTeXt document, with some exceptions. If you're using an existing style (like ''pre-funny'' in the example above), most definitions described below are already done for you.
 +
 
 +
<texcode>\usemodule[pre-general]</texcode>
 +
will include some [[source:s-pre-00.tex|general definitions]] that you may find useful or not.
 +
 
 +
=== Setting screen dimensions ===
 +
 
 +
<texcode>\setuppapersize[S6][S6]</texcode>
 +
will set the proper document ratio (3:2) to fit the computer screen.
 +
 
 +
=== Full-screen mode ===
 +
 
 +
<texcode>\setupinteractionscreen[option=max]</texcode>
 +
will cause launcing the PDF document in full-screen mode. In Acrobat you can use CTRL-L to switch between normal and full-screen mode.
 +
 
 +
=== Hyperlinks, buttons & navigation ===
 +
 
 +
{{todo|write something about them}}
 +
 
 +
=== Including Graphics ===
 +
 
 +
Everything works just the same way as graphics in usual documents. But if a presentation is your first document, let's repeat it once more here:
 +
 
 +
<texcode>\externalfigure[name][width=...]%% (probably surrounded by \placefigure)</texcode>
 +
 
 +
=== Graphics with Metafun ===
 +
 
 +
{{todo|how to make page-dependant graphics}}
 +
 
 +
=== Animation ===
 +
 
 +
See [[Animation]] (page is still under construction).
 +
 
 +
 
 +
== Additional modules ==
 +
 
 +
* The [[RawSteps]] module enables you to build a presentation step-by-step without the usage of JavaScript
 +
 
 +
== Examples of presentations ==
 +
 
 +
See also [[Sample documents]]
 +
 
 +
{{Todo|collect some + some extremely simple}}
 +
 
 +
* '''Introduction to ConTeXt''' (in French) by Denis Roegel at Gutenberg meeting in 2002 ([http://www.loria.fr/~roegel/TeX/context-gut2002.tex tex], [http://www.loria.fr/~roegel/TeX/context-gut2002.pdf pdf]) <i>(please add a link to the page from where these two documents are linked to if you find it)</i>
 +
 
 +
== Some Ideas ==
  
 
Here's an Interesting post, written by Maurice Diamantini:
 
Here's an Interesting post, written by Maurice Diamantini:
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* In general, I seem to have much more luck with advi then with xdvi for doing slides. It supports all kinds of interactive things. I've been told it can even do plugins (movies and such), but they only have a LaTeX package to support that.
 
* In general, I seem to have much more luck with advi then with xdvi for doing slides. It supports all kinds of interactive things. I've been told it can even do plugins (movies and such), but they only have a LaTeX package to support that.
  
==Working Example (for the ones not satisfied with \presentationstep)==
+
===Working Example (for the ones not satisfied with \presentationstep)===
  
 
Here are some simple macros almost fully satisfying the idea above with [[SlideWithSteps]], shared with the others by Otared Kavian:
 
Here are some simple macros almost fully satisfying the idea above with [[SlideWithSteps]], shared with the others by Otared Kavian:
 
[[http://archive.contextgarden.net/message/20041103.083500.43ac3121.html]]. David Munger also derived an alternative [[http://archive.contextgarden.net/message/20041106.080646.2544e4f3.html]] from Otared Kavian's work.
 
[[http://archive.contextgarden.net/message/20041103.083500.43ac3121.html]]. David Munger also derived an alternative [[http://archive.contextgarden.net/message/20041106.080646.2544e4f3.html]] from Otared Kavian's work.

Revision as of 10:15, 23 October 2005

< Main Page | \SlideWithSteps >


Using existing presentation styles

Even if you are not going to use the existing presentation styles (you're strongly encouraged to make your own anyway), these are wonderful examples to learn some new techniques. See Presentation Styles for a list of available styles.

\usemodule[pre-funny]

You can usually change background color or make minor changes to the existing style in a pretty simple way (I hope it will be described in Presentation Styles how to do that one day). You may have to override some font definitions used for a specific style if you don't have the font installed.

Making your own presentation style

Building a presentation in ConTeXt is not much different than preparing an usual ConTeXt document, with some exceptions. If you're using an existing style (like pre-funny in the example above), most definitions described below are already done for you.

\usemodule[pre-general]

will include some general definitions that you may find useful or not.

Setting screen dimensions

\setuppapersize[S6][S6]

will set the proper document ratio (3:2) to fit the computer screen.

Full-screen mode

\setupinteractionscreen[option=max]

will cause launcing the PDF document in full-screen mode. In Acrobat you can use CTRL-L to switch between normal and full-screen mode.

Hyperlinks, buttons & navigation


TODO: write something about them (See: To-Do List)


Including Graphics

Everything works just the same way as graphics in usual documents. But if a presentation is your first document, let's repeat it once more here:

\externalfigure[name][width=...]%% (probably surrounded by \placefigure)

Graphics with Metafun


TODO: how to make page-dependant graphics (See: To-Do List)


Animation

See Animation (page is still under construction).


Additional modules

  • The RawSteps module enables you to build a presentation step-by-step without the usage of JavaScript

Examples of presentations

See also Sample documents


TODO: collect some + some extremely simple (See: To-Do List)


  • Introduction to ConTeXt (in French) by Denis Roegel at Gutenberg meeting in 2002 (tex, pdf) (please add a link to the page from where these two documents are linked to if you find it)

Some Ideas

Here's an Interesting post, written by Maurice Diamantini: [[1]]

...

So I think that ConTeXt should provide a mean (option in textexec) to make pdf-only version of presentation.

Finaly there could be three output levels for pdf presentation :

  • presentation step using javascript (with allow blinking, merging, zooming or other nice flashing features ;-)
  • presentation step without javascript (one pdf page by step)
    • Good format for presentation by foreign pdf reader
  • pdf file one pdf page for each final step by page
    • Good format for printing 2up or 4up slides
    • This third output would also allow to print a "slide + comment" version of the presentation for the speacker.

The option of texexec could be something like

--pdfonly

instead of --pdf, or simply

--use-javascript=false
  • In general, I seem to have much more luck with advi then with xdvi for doing slides. It supports all kinds of interactive things. I've been told it can even do plugins (movies and such), but they only have a LaTeX package to support that.

Working Example (for the ones not satisfied with \presentationstep)

Here are some simple macros almost fully satisfying the idea above with SlideWithSteps, shared with the others by Otared Kavian: [[2]]. David Munger also derived an alternative [[3]] from Otared Kavian's work.